Mark F Sabbagh, MD, PhD

Mark F Sabbagh, MD, PhD

Resident in Anatomic Pathology

Massachusetts General Hospital

Harvard Medical School

Hello!

I am a pathology resident at MGH. I am generally interested in understanding how the molecules produced by our cells impact human development, health, and disease. I have a broad set of research interests that include exploring mechanisms of endothelial cell plasticity as a model for vertebrate gene regulation and cell identity, treating diseases of the brain and eye by manipulating gene expression at the blood-brain and blood-retina barriers, anti-phage defense systems in bacteria, and the role of symbiosis in prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

I earned my ScB in Neuroscience at Brown where I worked with Eric Morrow. I pursued combined MD-PhD training in the Medical Scientist Training Program at Johns Hopkins where I completed my doctoral research with Jeremy Nathans. Using next-generation sequencing-based assays, I generated a broad catalogue of gene regulatory features across early postnatal vascular endothelium of the brain, liver, lung, and kidney from the mouse. I then focused on the role of beta-catenin/Wnt signaling in blood-brain barrier development and maintenance. You can explore this data at the Vascular Endothelial Cell Trans-omics Resource Database.

Outside of my academic pursuits, I enjoy watching dark comedies and spending time with my wife and dog.

Interests
  • Blood-Brain Barrier Functional Genomics
  • Neuropathology and Ophthalmic Pathology
  • Parasites of Genomes, Cells, and Humans
Education
  • MD, 2021

    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • PhD in Neuroscience, 2021

    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • ScB in Neuroscience, 2012

    Brown University

Publications

(2019). Activation of mast cell expressed Mas-related G- protein coupled receptors drives non-histaminergic itch. Immunity.

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(2019). Beta-catenin signaling regulates barrier-specific gene expression in circumventricular organ and ocular vasculatures. eLife.

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(2018). Affinity capture of polyribosomes followed by RNAseq (ACAPseq), a discovery platform for protein-protein interactions. eLife.

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(2018). Transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of CNS and non-CNS vascular endothelial cells. eLife.

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Awards

NRSA F30 Fellowship
Cell Competition in the Developing Mammalian Central Nervous System Vasculature